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Imam Muhammad ibn AbdulWahhab Mosque


Description


This Mosque was named after the influential Imam Sheikh Muhammad Bin Abdul Wahhab. The Mosque was built as a cultural centre to serve the local community. It is the largest in the State of Qatar, and was opened in 2011.

The mosque is located in Alajabilat area to the north of Doha's city center. The Mosque complex comprises gardens, open and covered parking lots, among other facilities. Construction works began in 2006 with an estimated cost of 420 million Riyals. The project total area is approximately 175,164m2, the total covered area is 27,644m2, and the percentage of covered area is 15.8%. The mosque accommodates about 11,000 worshippers. Women prayer hall accommodates about 1,200. The courtyard is used during Friday prayer by around 30,000 worshippers. 

The Mosque comprises basement, ground and mezzanine floors. The ground floor, the mezzanine and the VIP area are among the most important sections. The main prayer hall for men and women ablution area located by the entrance in the ground floor along a space for people with special needs, occupy a total area of 12,000 square meters. Women prayer area, library and two classes are located in the mezzanine, which cover an area of 25,000 square meters. Car parks occupy more than 2,000 square meters and accommodate about 347 cars, with 600 square meters reserved for the VIP. 

This gigantic mosque has become a beacon for knowledge and education. It hosts lectures, courses, Fiqh lessons for students throughout the year. The mosque offers web educational, social and cultural programs. The website offers narrative about Muhammad Bin Abdul Wahhab, a list of his books, as well as events and activities either held or in the making. It also exhibits 237 photos of the mosque, in addition to visualizations, which contain 26 passages from mosque lectures. The site also provides prayer times in cities around the world.

The mosque comprises 99 domes; 28 large ones, 65 small domes, six in the surrounding landscape, and one minaret. Two domes are situated above the mihrab. Large number of chandeliers and lighting lamps hung from the domes provide a calm internal atmosphere. This grand mosque has three main gates, and the prayer hall can be accessed by 17 doors.

The architecture of the mosque is unique. It differs from other common prototypes in mosque architecture and sets up a novel one. It adheres to traditional architecture in Qatar, and resembles simple Qatari heritage. It simulates the form and, to a certain extent, the composition inherent in Boualaqbib mosque located in the market area next to Grand Hamad Street. 

The site is surrounded by one main street and three secondary streets. The mosque was built in the northwestern part of the site, with the main mosque block directed towards Qibla. The design reveals novel thinking invoking landscape techniques to accommodate car parks outside the mosque in open areas, linking minor roads with the outside main street network. 

The ground floor plan copies traditional mosque design seen in the Islamic period in North Africa. The ground floor comprises four longitudinal rows parallel to the Qibla wall in the main prayer hall. The outside courtyard that precedes the main prayer hall is flanked by four corridors from all sides to act as buffer area between the outside open patio and the inner covered air-conditioned hall. Northern and Western Porticoes are surrounded by facilities from both sides, with stairs leading to the mezzanine floor. 

The Mezzanine floor opens onto the external courtyard from one end. From the other end, traditional woodwork opens onto the main prayer hall, which rises on two floors. In the main prayer hall a set of chandeliers are hung from the domes above. The architectural composition of the mezzanine allows horizontal and vertical connections. It gives a third dimension to the architectural spaces, especially the main prayer hall on the ground floor. 

The mosque character reflects desert environmental architecture with references to local historical heritage. This is evident in the use of corner towers, which reflect traditional desert defensive architecture in a contemporary style by converting corner towers into reading spaces. Such a transformation of spaces is also evident in the mihrab and minbar, the former designed as niche behind which a stair is concealed leading to the minber. 

The simplicity of architecture is further revealed through the design of elevations and sections. Facades have been designed as two vertical parts; a lower part at the height of gates and an upper part with small narrow openings and windows that help to keep low temperatures inside. The Minaret looks agile and reminds of Lighthouses. Its base is designed as a square, above which sits a decreasing cylinder. The proportions seem to integrate with the architectural character horizontally and vertically. 

The interior design is elegant and conveys quiet atmosphere through the use of material and warm colors. This is evident in the use of simple motifs or the decorations in wood works around the mosque. Lighting adds an impressive spectacle to the architectural distinction. The interior design complemented the overall external design of the mosque and expressed a distinct architectural identity.




Details

Location

Al Istiqlal St, Doha, Qatar

Worshippers

12390

Owners

The Ministry of Awqaf Affairs

Architect Name

Arab Engineering Bureau

Year of Build

2011

Area

175164 SQM

Drawings

Map

Description

This Mosque was named after the influential Imam Sheikh Muhammad Bin Abdul Wahhab. The Mosque was built as a cultural centre to serve the local community. It is the largest in the State of Qatar, and was opened in 2011.

The mosque is located in Alajabilat area to the north of Doha's city center. The Mosque complex comprises gardens, open and covered parking lots, among other facilities. Construction works began in 2006 with an estimated cost of 420 million Riyals. The project total area is approximately 175,164m2, the total covered area is 27,644m2, and the percentage of covered area is 15.8%. The mosque accommodates about 11,000 worshippers. Women prayer hall accommodates about 1,200. The courtyard is used during Friday prayer by around 30,000 worshippers. 

The Mosque comprises basement, ground and mezzanine floors. The ground floor, the mezzanine and the VIP area are among the most important sections. The main prayer hall for men and women ablution area located by the entrance in the ground floor along a space for people with special needs, occupy a total area of 12,000 square meters. Women prayer area, library and two classes are located in the mezzanine, which cover an area of 25,000 square meters. Car parks occupy more than 2,000 square meters and accommodate about 347 cars, with 600 square meters reserved for the VIP. 

This gigantic mosque has become a beacon for knowledge and education. It hosts lectures, courses, Fiqh lessons for students throughout the year. The mosque offers web educational, social and cultural programs. The website offers narrative about Muhammad Bin Abdul Wahhab, a list of his books, as well as events and activities either held or in the making. It also exhibits 237 photos of the mosque, in addition to visualizations, which contain 26 passages from mosque lectures. The site also provides prayer times in cities around the world.

The mosque comprises 99 domes; 28 large ones, 65 small domes, six in the surrounding landscape, and one minaret. Two domes are situated above the mihrab. Large number of chandeliers and lighting lamps hung from the domes provide a calm internal atmosphere. This grand mosque has three main gates, and the prayer hall can be accessed by 17 doors.

The architecture of the mosque is unique. It differs from other common prototypes in mosque architecture and sets up a novel one. It adheres to traditional architecture in Qatar, and resembles simple Qatari heritage. It simulates the form and, to a certain extent, the composition inherent in Boualaqbib mosque located in the market area next to Grand Hamad Street. 

The site is surrounded by one main street and three secondary streets. The mosque was built in the northwestern part of the site, with the main mosque block directed towards Qibla. The design reveals novel thinking invoking landscape techniques to accommodate car parks outside the mosque in open areas, linking minor roads with the outside main street network. 

The ground floor plan copies traditional mosque design seen in the Islamic period in North Africa. The ground floor comprises four longitudinal rows parallel to the Qibla wall in the main prayer hall. The outside courtyard that precedes the main prayer hall is flanked by four corridors from all sides to act as buffer area between the outside open patio and the inner covered air-conditioned hall. Northern and Western Porticoes are surrounded by facilities from both sides, with stairs leading to the mezzanine floor. 

The Mezzanine floor opens onto the external courtyard from one end. From the other end, traditional woodwork opens onto the main prayer hall, which rises on two floors. In the main prayer hall a set of chandeliers are hung from the domes above. The architectural composition of the mezzanine allows horizontal and vertical connections. It gives a third dimension to the architectural spaces, especially the main prayer hall on the ground floor. 

The mosque character reflects desert environmental architecture with references to local historical heritage. This is evident in the use of corner towers, which reflect traditional desert defensive architecture in a contemporary style by converting corner towers into reading spaces. Such a transformation of spaces is also evident in the mihrab and minbar, the former designed as niche behind which a stair is concealed leading to the minber. 

The simplicity of architecture is further revealed through the design of elevations and sections. Facades have been designed as two vertical parts; a lower part at the height of gates and an upper part with small narrow openings and windows that help to keep low temperatures inside. The Minaret looks agile and reminds of Lighthouses. Its base is designed as a square, above which sits a decreasing cylinder. The proportions seem to integrate with the architectural character horizontally and vertically. 

The interior design is elegant and conveys quiet atmosphere through the use of material and warm colors. This is evident in the use of simple motifs or the decorations in wood works around the mosque. Lighting adds an impressive spectacle to the architectural distinction. The interior design complemented the overall external design of the mosque and expressed a distinct architectural identity.