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Ali Bitchin Mosque


History


According to reports, Ali Bitchin was a non-Muslim who went by the names Piccini, Puccini, or Piccinino. Between 1630 and 1646, Ali Bitchin oversaw the Algerian Navy's fleet. He adopted the name Ali Bitchin and converted to Islam in 1599 through the ownership of the vessels by Fathullah Khoja. Then, in 1622, he gave the order to build a mosque using Ottoman architectural style. It had a 15-meter-tall, Maghrebi-style minaret as part of its amenities. 

The mosque's initial layout included three storeys, three rooms, 10 stores, a bakery, a hamam, a mill, and an inn, covering a 500 square meter space.

Several prominent politicians and religious figures stayed at the inn. Its hamam was particularly well-liked and was still in operation two years after the start of the French occupation. The mosque was surrounded by several businesses because it was situated in the casbah's commercial district. The mosque was briefly renamed "Sidi al-Mahdi Mosque" in 1703 to honor the current governor.

The minaret was lowered to a height of 12 meters during the French occupation.

The mosque was subsequently transformed into a military medicine facility before becoming a church in 1843. Some of the characteristics of the Islamic architectural style were lost during the conversion.

The mosque was subsequently transformed into a military medicine facility before becoming a church in 1843. Some of the characteristics of the Islamic architectural style were lost during the conversion.

Additionally, the French occupants broke down a Ketchaoua Mosque door and decorated the newly converted church with it.

The mosque was one of the 21 mosques in the casbah whose features had been changed or altered, such as by removing the location for wudu and changing the mihrab.

After the country gained its independence, the Christian cross was taken down from the minaret and it was re-consecrated to the mosque.

Urban and Architectural


Up to 500 worshipers might have been accommodated in the mosque at first. Now that it has been renovated in 2010, it can seat 300 more worshipers.

Description


is a revered mosque in Algeria's capital, Algiers. In 1622, Ali Bitchin gave the mosque his order for building. It is located inside the Casbah of Algiers, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is situated where Bab al-Wadi Street and the bottom part of the casbah meet.

Details

Location

Algiers, Algeria

Worshippers

800

Owners

Ali Bitchin

Year of Build

1622

Area

500 square meter

Drawings

Map

History

According to reports, Ali Bitchin was a non-Muslim who went by the names Piccini, Puccini, or Piccinino. Between 1630 and 1646, Ali Bitchin oversaw the Algerian Navy's fleet. He adopted the name Ali Bitchin and converted to Islam in 1599 through the ownership of the vessels by Fathullah Khoja. Then, in 1622, he gave the order to build a mosque using Ottoman architectural style. It had a 15-meter-tall, Maghrebi-style minaret as part of its amenities. 

The mosque's initial layout included three storeys, three rooms, 10 stores, a bakery, a hamam, a mill, and an inn, covering a 500 square meter space.

Several prominent politicians and religious figures stayed at the inn. Its hamam was particularly well-liked and was still in operation two years after the start of the French occupation. The mosque was surrounded by several businesses because it was situated in the casbah's commercial district. The mosque was briefly renamed "Sidi al-Mahdi Mosque" in 1703 to honor the current governor.

The minaret was lowered to a height of 12 meters during the French occupation.

The mosque was subsequently transformed into a military medicine facility before becoming a church in 1843. Some of the characteristics of the Islamic architectural style were lost during the conversion.

The mosque was subsequently transformed into a military medicine facility before becoming a church in 1843. Some of the characteristics of the Islamic architectural style were lost during the conversion.

Additionally, the French occupants broke down a Ketchaoua Mosque door and decorated the newly converted church with it.

The mosque was one of the 21 mosques in the casbah whose features had been changed or altered, such as by removing the location for wudu and changing the mihrab.

After the country gained its independence, the Christian cross was taken down from the minaret and it was re-consecrated to the mosque.

Urban and Architectural

Up to 500 worshipers might have been accommodated in the mosque at first. Now that it has been renovated in 2010, it can seat 300 more worshipers.

Description

is a revered mosque in Algeria's capital, Algiers. In 1622, Ali Bitchin gave the mosque his order for building. It is located inside the Casbah of Algiers, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is situated where Bab al-Wadi Street and the bottom part of the casbah meet.