Languages

King Fahd Mosque


History


The King Fahad Mosque, also known as the King Fahd Mosque, is a mosque in Culver City, California, a city in the US state of Los Angeles. The mosque has a seating capacity of 2,000 people and features a marble exterior, Turkish handmade tiles, and a 72-foot (22 m) tall tower with a gold leaf crescent on top.  The complex, which occupies a space of around 77,500 square feet (7,200 m2), also includes "classrooms, research centers, a bookshop, a children's playground, and a car park." 

The mosque was financed by Saudi Arabia, notably by Prince Abdulaziz and Fahd of Saudi Arabia, after whom it is named. Khalil Al Khalil, who is currently the chairman of the board and was the director general at the time, oversaw the project.

According to the Saudi Arabian Embassy, it cost $2.16 million, and the Washington Post, $8 million.  The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia "has given great attention to Islamic centers, institutes, and universities in non-Islamic countries to help Muslim minorities preserve their Islamic culture and educate them in the Arabic language," according to a statement from the Saudi Arabian Embassy released in conjunction with the opening of the mosque. 

Funding for the land was granted in 1993 by Prince Abdulaziz Bin Fahad Bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud, who was Minister of State and a member of the Saudi cabinet. In 1995, King Fahad promised to contribute money toward the building's construction. The mosque's construction got under way in April 1996, and former White House staff chief John Sununu attended the opening ceremony and dinner in July 1998. [2] As of 1998, facilities for a school for Qur'anic recitation and instruction in Islamic sciences were planned to be established close to the mosque.

Every day, the mosque is accessible for all five prayers. The Islamic Foundation of Shaikh Ibn Taymiyyah is its owner and manager.

Description


References


https://www.kingfahadmosque.org/

Details

Location

10980 Washington Blvd, Culver City, CA 90232, United States

Worshippers

2,000

Owners

The Islamic Foundation of Shaikh Ibn Taymiyyah

Year of Build

1998

Area

7,200 m2

Drawings

Map

History

The King Fahad Mosque, also known as the King Fahd Mosque, is a mosque in Culver City, California, a city in the US state of Los Angeles. The mosque has a seating capacity of 2,000 people and features a marble exterior, Turkish handmade tiles, and a 72-foot (22 m) tall tower with a gold leaf crescent on top.  The complex, which occupies a space of around 77,500 square feet (7,200 m2), also includes "classrooms, research centers, a bookshop, a children's playground, and a car park." 

The mosque was financed by Saudi Arabia, notably by Prince Abdulaziz and Fahd of Saudi Arabia, after whom it is named. Khalil Al Khalil, who is currently the chairman of the board and was the director general at the time, oversaw the project.

According to the Saudi Arabian Embassy, it cost $2.16 million, and the Washington Post, $8 million.  The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia "has given great attention to Islamic centers, institutes, and universities in non-Islamic countries to help Muslim minorities preserve their Islamic culture and educate them in the Arabic language," according to a statement from the Saudi Arabian Embassy released in conjunction with the opening of the mosque. 

Funding for the land was granted in 1993 by Prince Abdulaziz Bin Fahad Bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud, who was Minister of State and a member of the Saudi cabinet. In 1995, King Fahad promised to contribute money toward the building's construction. The mosque's construction got under way in April 1996, and former White House staff chief John Sununu attended the opening ceremony and dinner in July 1998. [2] As of 1998, facilities for a school for Qur'anic recitation and instruction in Islamic sciences were planned to be established close to the mosque.

Every day, the mosque is accessible for all five prayers. The Islamic Foundation of Shaikh Ibn Taymiyyah is its owner and manager.

Description