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Al Ikhlas naza Mosque


Description


The mosque located at Section 13, Shah Alam can accommodate 1,500 worshippers at any one time and also provides facilities that promote community activities. The mosque is a welcome insertion into the fabric of the residential neighbourhood, promoting a sense of identity and community.

The mosque’s plan consists of two simple geometries which are first layered and then rotated. The Main Prayer Hall volume is orientated to the “qiblat” whilst the Amenities Block is aligned with the adjacent main road, Jalan Lompat Pagar. The Amenities Block acts not only as an anchor to the site but also as a protective layer around the Main Prayer Hall. Sandwiched between these volumes is a walkway that surrounds the Main Prayer Hall. The residual geometries created by the intertwined volumes hold richly landscaped courtyards.

These configurations allow for a transitional experience when one enters the mosque – along the walkway, from the amenity spaces, through the courtyards and into the Main Prayer Hall. The walk instills a feeling of ‘transformation’, from the secular world into the spiritual realm. This feeling is intensified through the spatial progression from more open spaces towards the quieter and protected Main Prayer Hall. Although the design retains a dome and a minaret – 2 traditional Middle-Eastern mosques features, the elements are given a modern interpretation.

The dome is uncharacteristically subtle and employs a gentle curve. It allows daylight to wash into the heart of the mosque via a skylight. As a community building, the mosque is accessible from all sides and its facades are made as permeable as possible. The penetrable facades allows for an environmentally-conscious building ventilation strategy. The envelope consists of ‘perforated’ walls that allow for natural air flow. The cross-ventilation through the Main Prayer Hall is further assisted by use of 7 over-sized feature ceiling fans.

The walkway that surrounds the Main Prayer Hall is lined with steel cables that support climbing shrubs. This encourages the shrubs to grow into screens of foliage that subdue the tropical sun whilst giving a soft textured backdrop to the Main Prayer Hall. Subtle colors, natural material finishes and a lush but simple landscape imbues the mosque with a peaceful aura. Through its simplicity and clarity, the mosque is poised to be a tranquil place of worship and aspires to give the local community a humble yet meaningful landmark.

Details

Location

40100 Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia

Worshippers

1500

Architect Name

GDP Architect

Year of Build

2013

Area

4111 sqm

Drawings

Map

Description

The mosque located at Section 13, Shah Alam can accommodate 1,500 worshippers at any one time and also provides facilities that promote community activities. The mosque is a welcome insertion into the fabric of the residential neighbourhood, promoting a sense of identity and community.

The mosque’s plan consists of two simple geometries which are first layered and then rotated. The Main Prayer Hall volume is orientated to the “qiblat” whilst the Amenities Block is aligned with the adjacent main road, Jalan Lompat Pagar. The Amenities Block acts not only as an anchor to the site but also as a protective layer around the Main Prayer Hall. Sandwiched between these volumes is a walkway that surrounds the Main Prayer Hall. The residual geometries created by the intertwined volumes hold richly landscaped courtyards.

These configurations allow for a transitional experience when one enters the mosque – along the walkway, from the amenity spaces, through the courtyards and into the Main Prayer Hall. The walk instills a feeling of ‘transformation’, from the secular world into the spiritual realm. This feeling is intensified through the spatial progression from more open spaces towards the quieter and protected Main Prayer Hall. Although the design retains a dome and a minaret – 2 traditional Middle-Eastern mosques features, the elements are given a modern interpretation.

The dome is uncharacteristically subtle and employs a gentle curve. It allows daylight to wash into the heart of the mosque via a skylight. As a community building, the mosque is accessible from all sides and its facades are made as permeable as possible. The penetrable facades allows for an environmentally-conscious building ventilation strategy. The envelope consists of ‘perforated’ walls that allow for natural air flow. The cross-ventilation through the Main Prayer Hall is further assisted by use of 7 over-sized feature ceiling fans.

The walkway that surrounds the Main Prayer Hall is lined with steel cables that support climbing shrubs. This encourages the shrubs to grow into screens of foliage that subdue the tropical sun whilst giving a soft textured backdrop to the Main Prayer Hall. Subtle colors, natural material finishes and a lush but simple landscape imbues the mosque with a peaceful aura. Through its simplicity and clarity, the mosque is poised to be a tranquil place of worship and aspires to give the local community a humble yet meaningful landmark.